Posts Tagged ‘human populations’

CES, Week 21: Human Demographics continued

January 19, 2010

We will continue our data mining on Wednesday and we will spend the rest of the week trying to answer the Big Question for this unit: What is the point at which a country becomes “developed”? On Thursday we’ll figure out how to organize all your data, and we’ll start out trans-national analysis. On Friday, the work will continue.

Wednesday (1/20/10): “Data Mining”. Last day of in-class research

Thursday (1/21/10): Whole-class activity: what metrics matter, and how shall we compare these countries?

Friday (1/22/10): Continue  trans-national  comparison (short day, focus Friday.)

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CES, Week 20: Human Population Growth

January 10, 2010

Last week might have been the shortest school week in history. 1.5 days. It makes finding continuity withinthe curriculum difficult (espeically with me at the helm). Never the less, we’ll continue focusing on the impacts humans have had on the natural capital that sustains us. We will spend at least two days looking at the factors driving exponential human populaiton growth, and you will begin individual investigations of  devloped and developing nations.

Monday (1/11/10): Finish discussion on Human impacts on Biosphere. Assignment: Specific examples of human impacts on biosphere.

Tuesday (1/12/10): Human Population Growth I

Wednesday (1/13/10): Human Population Growth II

Thursday (1/14/10): Human Demographics Assignment. Each student will pull two countries (one developed and one developing) out of a hat. Batering may insue. Expectations for assignment will be discussed.

Friday (1/15/10): Begin brainstorming Human Demographics Assignment/Determine timeline for completion/Campus recycling

CES, week 19: Human Population Growth

January 5, 2010

Welcome back, kids. I hope you had a restful break, and I hope you retained some of that good knowledge on the ecology of biomes, ecosystems, communities, and populations. ‘Cause let me tell you something…it is completely neccessary for understanding human population growth, and for understanding how humans use the natural capital available on Earth.

This week will be a quick introduction of the fundamental principles of human population growth, and the basic idea of developed and developing countries. Maybe we’ll get into the sticky topic of “transitional countries”. I know you all will enjoy this unit, and I’m sure it we will have some rich discussions.

Next week you will dive in deeper to human demographics by investigating a developing and developed nation in the same region. This project is similar to your boime project, but it focuses more on how humans use the natural capital, not so much on the natural capital itself. I will tell you more about that project next week.

So, without further ado…welcome to the spring semester

Wednesday (1/6/09): An overview of human uses of natural resources

Thursday (1/7/09): An overview of human population growth (warning…this is a data-heavy presentation).

Friday (1/8/09): Wrap up human population growth and campus recycling

APES: Check out the demographics links

November 18, 2009

Hey y’all, check out the blog roll for a look at different demographics projects. They were all well made and quite informative. It’s amazing, this research stuff, you actually learn something.

Two groups did power points. The South American and European projects will be up on Sharepoint soon.

APES, Week 10: Human Demographics

October 13, 2009

Welcome to week 10, quarter 2, the next phase in APES. It’s time to turn our attention to our species. We’ll look at Homo sapiens abundance and distribution as well as our interactions with the natural capital that sustains our existence.

Monday-Tuesday: Fall Break

Wednesday: Individual search for a definition of a “developed”, “developing”, and “transitional”
country,  with a definition for each.

Thursday: Human Demographics Intro

Friday: Human Demographics continued, receive assignments.